Martin and Malcolm and America A Dream or a Nightmare

Martin and Malcolm and America  A Dream or a Nightmare Author James H. Cone
ISBN-10 9781608330409
Release 1992
Pages 13
Download Link Click Here

This groundbreaking and highly acclaimed work examines the two most influential African-American leaders of this century. While Martin Luther King, Jr., saw America as "a dream . . . Cone cuts through superficial assessments of King and Malcolm as polar opposites to reveal two men whose visions were moving toward convergence. (Orbis Books)



Martin Malcolm America

Martin   Malcolm   America Author James H. Cone
ISBN-10 1570759790
Release 2012
Pages 358
Download Link Click Here

James Cone cuts through the superficial assessments of King and Malcolm as polar opposites to reveal two men whose visions were complementary and moving towards convergence.



Martin Malcolm America

Martin   Malcolm   America Author James H. Cone
ISBN-10 9780883448243
Release 1992
Pages 358
Download Link Click Here

Reexamines the ideology of the two most prominent leaders of the civil rights movement of the 1960s



Dreams and Nightmares

Dreams and Nightmares Author Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson
ISBN-10 0813037239
Release 2012
Pages 215
Download Link Click Here

One man dreamed of a country united in true racial equality. Another saw this as a nightmare that served only the interest of wealthy whites. Both were sons of Baptist ministers. Both grew up to be icons of the civil rights movement. This book explores Martin Luther King, Jr.'s dream and much more.



The Cross and the Lynching Tree

The Cross and the Lynching Tree Author James H. Cone
ISBN-10 9781608330010
Release 2011
Pages 202
Download Link Click Here

A landmark in the conversation about race and religion in America. "They put him to death by hanging him on a tree." Acts 10:39 The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this powerful new work, theologian James H. Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of black folk. Both the cross and the lynching tree represent the worst in human beings and at the same time a thirst for life that refuses to let the worst determine our final meaning. While the lynching tree symbolized white power and "black death," the cross symbolizes divine power and "black life" God overcoming the power of sin and death. For African Americans, the image of Jesus, hung on a tree to die, powerfully grounded their faith that God was with them, even in the suffering of the lynching era. In a work that spans social history, theology, and cultural studies, Cone explores the message of the spirituals and the power of the blues; the passion and of Emmet Till and the engaged vision of Martin Luther King, Jr.; he invokes the spirits of Billie Holliday and Langston Hughes, Fannie Lou Hamer and Ida B. Well, and the witness of black artists, writers, preachers, and fighters for justice. And he remembers the victims, especially the 5,000 who perished during the lynching period. Through their witness he contemplates the greatest challenge of any Christian theology to explain how life can be made meaningful in the face of death and injustice.



God of the Oppressed

God of the Oppressed Author James H. Cone
ISBN-10 9781570751585
Release 1997-01-01
Pages 257
Download Link Click Here

In his reflections on God, Jesus, suffering, and liberation, James H. Cone relates the gospel message to the experience of the black community. But a wider theme of the book is the role that social and historical context plays in framing the questions we address to God as well as the mode of the answers provided.



My Soul Looks Back

My Soul Looks Back Author James H. Cone
ISBN-10 9781608330393
Release 1986
Pages 144
Download Link Click Here

Firmly rooted in the black church tradition, James H. Cone relates the formative features of his faith journey, from his childhood experience in Bearden, Arkansas, and his father's steadfast resistance to racism, through racial discrimination in graduate school, to his controversial articulation of a faith that seeks to break the shackles of racial oppression.



The Death and Life of Malcolm X

The Death and Life of Malcolm X Author Peter Louis Goldman
ISBN-10 0252007743
Release 1979
Pages 470
Download Link Click Here

Drawing from interviews with Malcolm X and the recollections of his friends and associates, the author illuminates the struggles of the Black leader during his last years and the events surrounding his assassination



A Black Theology of Liberation

A Black Theology of Liberation Author James H. Cone
ISBN-10 9781608330362
Release 1970
Pages 166
Download Link Click Here

With the publication of his two early works, Black Theology & Black Power (1969) and A Black Theology of Liberation (1970), James Cone emerged as one of the most creative and provocative theological voices in North America. These books, which offered a searing indictment of white theology and society, introduced a radical reappraisal of the Christian message for our time. Combining the visions of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr., Cone radically reappraised Christianity from the perspective of the oppressed black community in North America. Forty years later, his work retains its original power, enhanced now by reflections on the evolution of his own thinking and of black theology and on the needs of the present moment.



A Chicano Theology

A Chicano Theology Author Andres G. Guerrero
ISBN-10 9781606082355
Release 2008-11-01
Pages 192
Download Link Click Here

I selected twelve themes because of their importance to the Chicano community. These themes deal with Chicano liberation. One cannot speak about liberation. One cannot speak about liberation without mentioning these social political, economic, psychological and religious issues, nor without mentioning these symbols. - Machismo y La Mujer - Racism-Classism - Education and Labor - Violence and Nonviolence - Respect for the rights of others is peace (Benito Ju‡rez) - The Land - Fatalistic and Anarchistic Tendencies - The Catholic Church - Theology - The Symbol of Exodus - The Religious-Spiritual Symbol of Guadalupe - The Secular-Spiritual Symbol of La Raza C—smica - from the book



We Will Get to the Promised Land

We Will Get to the Promised Land Author Hak Joon Lee
ISBN-10 9781532617959
Release 2017-02-17
Pages 238
Download Link Click Here

In_We Will Get to the Promised Land, Lee explores the entire scope of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s spirituality, tracing its roots to African communal religious traditions and African Americans' fight for racial justice. He presents communal-political spirituality as constituting the heart of King's multifaceted spirituality. Lee reinterprets King's personal journey, theology, and ethics, as well as the Civil Rights Movement, in light of this communal-political spirituality, while assessing its ongoing importance for the common life in the twenty-first century, with particular attention to the war on terror and interreligious ecumenism.



Making Malcolm

Making Malcolm Author Michael Eric Dyson
ISBN-10 9780199962570
Release 2010-04-10
Pages
Download Link Click Here

Malcolm X's cultural rebirth--his improbable second coming--brims with irony. The nineties are marked by intense and often angry debates about racial authenticity and "selling out," and the participants in these debates--from politicians to filmmakers to rap artists--often draw on Malcolm's scorching rebukes to such moves. Meanwhile, Malcolm's "X" is marketed in countless business endeavors and is stylishly branded on baseball hats and T-shirts sported by every age, race, and gender. But this rampant commercialization is only a small part of Malcolm's remarkable renaissance. One of the century's most complex black leaders, he is currently blazing a new path across contemporary popular culture, and has even seared the edges of an academy that once froze him out. Thirty years after his assassination, what is it about his life and words that speaks so powerfully to so many? In Making Malcolm, Michael Eric Dyson probes the myths and meanings of Malcolm X for our time. From Spike Lee's film biography to Eugene Wolfenstein's psychobiographical study, from hip-hop culture to gender and racial politics, Dyson cuts a critical swathe through both the idolization and the vicious caricatures that have undermined appreciation of Malcolm's greatest accomplishments. The book's first section offers a boldly original and penetrating analysis of the major trends in interpreting Malcolm's legacy since his death, and the fiercely competing interests and ideologies that have shaped these trends. From mainstream books to writings published by the independent black press, Dyson identifies and examines the different "Malcolms" who have emerged in popular and academic investigations of his life and career. With impassioned and compelling force, Dyson argues that Malcolm was too formidable a historic figure--the movements he led too variable and contradictory, the passion and intelligence he summoned too extraordinary and disconcerting--to be viewed through any narrow cultural prism. The second half of the book offers a fascinating exploration of Malcolm's relationship to a resurgent black nationalism, his influence on contemporary black filmmakers and musicians, and his use in progressive black politics. From sexism and gangsta rap to the painful predicament of black males, from the politics of black nationalism to the possibilities of race in the Age of Clinton, Dyson's trenchant and often inspiring analysis reveals how Malcolm's legacy continues to spur debate and action today. A rare and important book, Making Malcolm casts new light not only on the life and career of a seminal black leader, but on the aspirations and passions of the growing numbers who have seized on his life for insight and inspiration.



Birmingham Revolution

Birmingham Revolution Author Edward Gilbreath
ISBN-10 9780830884452
Release 2013-12-01
Pages 208
Download Link Click Here

From time to time prophetic Christian voices rise to challenge our nation s "original sin." In the twentieth century, compelled by the Spirit of God and a yearning for freedom, the African American church took the lead in heralding the effort. Like almost no other movement before or since, Christian people gave force to a social mission. And, remarkably, they did it largely through nonviolent actions. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. s words and historic efforts as the Moses of this civil rights movement stand out as perhaps the most significant instance of a modern Christian leader acting in a prophetic role to instigate political change. In many ways "The Letter from Birmingham Jail" stands at the center of that movement. In this book African American journalist Edward Gilbreath explores the place of that letter in the life and work of Dr. King. Birmingham Revolution is not simply a work of historical reflection. Gilbreath encourages us to reflect on the relevance of King's work for the church and culture of our day. Whether it s in debates about immigration, economic redistribution or presidential birth certificates, race continues to play a role in shaping society. What part will the church play in the ongoing struggle?



Extremist for Love

Extremist for Love Author Rufus Burrow Jr.
ISBN-10 9781451480276
Release 2014-01-01
Pages 250
Download Link Click Here

In spite of extensive research and publishing on King, insufficient attention has been given to the convergence of ideas and action in his life. In an era where people are often sorted into the categories of “thinker” and “doer,” King stands out—a rare mix of the deeply profound thinker and intellect who put the fruit of that reflection into the service of direct social action.



China s Nightmare America s Dream

China s Nightmare  America s Dream Author William H. Avery
ISBN-10 9381506078
Release 2012
Pages 244
Download Link Click Here

On India's history, economics, domestic politics, and international relations among other nations.



The Spirituals and the Blues

The Spirituals and the Blues Author James H. Cone
ISBN-10 9780883448434
Release 1992
Pages 141
Download Link Click Here

Cone explores two classic aspects of African-American culture--the spirituals and the blues. He tells the captivating story of how slaves and the children of slaves used this music to affirm their essential humanity in the face of oppression. The blues are shown to be a "this-worldly" expression of cultural and political rebellion. The spirituals tell about the "attempt to carve out a significant existence in a very trying situation".



Islam and the Blackamerican

Islam and the Blackamerican Author Sherman A. Jackson
ISBN-10 0195343573
Release 2005-04-14
Pages 256
Download Link Click Here

Sherman Jackson offers a trenchant examination of the career of Islam among the blacks of America. Jackson notes that no one has offered a convincing explanation of why Islam spread among Blackamericans (a coinage he explains and defends) but not among white Americans or Hispanics. The assumption has been that there is an African connection. In fact, Jackson shows, none of the distinctive features of African Islam appear in the proto-Islamic, black nationalist movements of the early 20th century. Instead, he argues, Islam owes its momentum to the distinctively American phenomenon of "Black Religion," a God-centered holy protest against anti-black racism. Islam in Black America begins as part of a communal search for tools with which to combat racism and redefine American blackness. The 1965 repeal of the National Origins Quota System led to a massive influx of foreign Muslims, who soon greatly outnumbered the blacks whom they found here practicing an indigenous form of Islam. Immigrant Muslims would come to exercise a virtual monopoly over the definition of a properly constituted Islamic life in America. For these Muslims, the nemesis was not white supremacy, but "the West." In their eyes, the West was not a racial, but a religious and civilizational threat. American blacks soon learned that opposition to the West and opposition to white supremacy were not synonymous. Indeed, says Jackson, one cannot be anti-Western without also being on some level anti-Blackamerican. Like the Black Christians of an earlier era struggling to find their voice in the context of Western Christianity, Black Muslims now began to strive to find their black, American voice in the context of the super-tradition of historical Islam. Jackson argues that Muslim tradition itself contains the resources to reconcile blackness, American-ness, and adherence to Islam. It is essential, he contends, to preserve within Islam the legitimate aspects of Black Religion, in order to avoid what Stephen Carter calls the domestication of religion, whereby religion is rendered incapable of resisting the state and the dominant culture. At the same time, Jackson says, it is essential for Blackamerican Muslims to reject an exclusive focus on the public square and the secular goal of subverting white supremacy (and Arab/immigrant supremacy) and to develop a tradition of personal piety and spirituality attuned to distinctive Blackamerican needs and idiosyncrasies.