A People s History of Baseball

A People s History of Baseball Author Mitchell Nathanson
ISBN-10 0252093925
Release 2012-03-30
Pages 272
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From its first pitch, baseball has reflected national values and promoted the idea of what it means to be American. Beloved narratives tied the national pastime to beliefs as fundamental to our civic life as racial equality, patriotism, heroism, and virtuous capitalism. Mitchell Nathanson calls foul. Rejecting the myths and much-told tales, he examines how power is as much a part of baseball--and America--as pine tar and eye black. Indeed, the struggles for power within the game paralleled those that defined our nation. Nathanson follows the new Americans who sought club ownership to promote their social status in the increasingly closed caste system of nineteenth-century America. He shows how the rise and public rebuke of the Players Association reflects the collective spirit of working and middle-class America in the mid-twentieth century and the countervailing forces that sought to beat back the emerging movement. He lays bare the debilitating effects of a harsh double standard that required African American players to possess an unimpeachable character merely to take the field--a standard no white player had to meet. Told with passion and righteous outrage, A People's History of Baseball offers an incisive alternative history of America's much-loved--if misunderstood--national pastime.



A People s History of World War II

A People s History of World War II Author Marc Favreau
ISBN-10 9781595586346
Release 2011-09-20
Pages 304
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The most destructive war in human history, World War II continues to generate an astonishingly rich trove of historical material, writings, and first-person recollections, which are essential to any appreciation of this most pivotal of historical events. A People's History of World War II brings the full range of human experience during World War II to life through some of the most vivid accounts and images available anywhere. This concise and accessible volume includes first-person interviews by Studs Terkel; rare archival photographs from the Office of War Information collection; propaganda comics from Theodore Geisel (Dr. Seuss); narratives of wartime experiences from writers including historian Howard Zinn, civil rights activist Robert L. Carter, and celebrated French author Marguerite Duras; and selections from the writings of some of the world’s leading historians of the war, including John Dower, Philippe Burrin, David Wyman, and Eric Hobsbawm.



Shipwrecked

Shipwrecked Author Jon Wells
ISBN-10 1935347187
Release 2012
Pages 279
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Jon Wells, a baseball writer who has covered the Seattle Mariners for more than 15 years, asserts that poor management and shortsighted ownership combined to keep a team with three first-ballot Hall of Fame players, each in the prime of his career, from reaching the World Series. Wells details every misstep by the Mariners during the team's 35-year history. But wait, there's hope! Can General Manager Jack Zduriencik bring in enough young talent to make this club a contender again, as he did for the Milwaukee Brewers? "Shipwrecked" includes 45 color photos, most of which have not been published elsewhere.



The Empire Strikes Out

The Empire Strikes Out Author Robert Elias
ISBN-10 9781595585288
Release 2010-01-19
Pages 448
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Is the face of American baseball throughout the world that of goodwill ambassador or ugly American? Has baseball crafted its own image or instead been at the mercy of broader forces shaping our society and the globe? The Empire Strikes Out gives us the sweeping story of how baseball and America are intertwined in the export of “the American way.” From the Civil War to George W. Bush and the Iraq War, we see baseball’s role in developing the American empire, first at home and then beyond our shores. And from Albert Spalding and baseball’s first World Tour to Bud Selig and the World Baseball Classic, we witness the globalization of America’s national pastime and baseball’s role in spreading the American dream. Besides describing baseball’s frequent and often surprising connections to America’s presence around the world, Elias assesses the effects of this relationship both on our foreign policies and on the sport itself and asks whether baseball can play a positive role or rather only reinforce America’s dominance around the globe. Like Franklin Foer in How Soccer Explains the World, Elias is driven by compelling stories, unusual events, and unique individuals. His seamless integration of original research and compelling analysis makes this a baseball book that’s about more than just sports.



Baseball in Europe

Baseball in Europe Author Josh Chetwynd
ISBN-10 9780786451753
Release 2008-07-16
Pages 344
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Many are aware that baseball's European ancestry stretches back centuries, but few realize just how extensive the modern game's history is on the Continent and British Isles. Baseball as we recognize it has been played there since the 1870s, and in several countries the players and devoted followers have included royalty, Hall of Famers from the U.S. major leagues, and captains of industry. Organized by country, this heavily researched book delves into the history of baseball in 40 nations, describing not only the efforts to spread the game but also the culture of baseball unique to Europe. Appendices cover topics from major leaguers who have played in European domestic leagues to a glossary of baseball terms in seven European languages.



Baseball The people s game

Baseball  The people s game Author Harold Seymour
ISBN-10 UCSC:32106009123362
Release 1971
Pages
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Baseball The people s game has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from Baseball The people s game also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full Baseball The people s game book for free.



A People s History of Sports in the United States

A People s History of Sports in the United States Author David Zirin
ISBN-10 9781595586636
Release 2008-09-09
Pages 302
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In this long-awaited book from the rising superstar of sportswriting, whose blog “The Edge of Sports” is read each week by thousands of people across the country, Dave Zirin offers a riotously entertaining chronicle of larger-than-life sporting characters and dramatic contests and what amounts to an alternative history of the United States as seen through the games its people played. Through Zirin’s eyes, sports are never mere games, but a reflection of—and spur toward—the political conflicts that shape American society. Half a century before Jackie Robinson was born, the black ballplayer Moses Fleetwood Walker brandished a revolver to keep racist fans at bay, then took his regular place in the lineup. In the midst of the Depression, when almost no black athletes were allowed on the U.S. Olympic team, athletes held a Counter Olympics where a third of the participants were African American. A People’s History of Sports in the United States is replete with surprises for seasoned sports fans, while anyone interested in history will be amazed by the connections Zirin draws between politics and pop flies. As Jeff Chang, author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop, puts it, “After you read him, you’ll never see sports the same way again.”



Baseball The people s game

Baseball  The people s game Author Harold Seymour
ISBN-10 UOM:49015002220284
Release 1990
Pages 672
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Dr. Harold Seymour has pioneered the scholarly study of baseball. Hailed by Sports Illustrated as the "Edward Gibbon of baseball history," he is the first professional historian to produce an authoritative, multivolume chronicle of America's national pastime. The first two volumes of this study--The Early Years and The Golden Age--won universal acclaim. The New York Times wrote that they "will grip every American who has invested part of his youth and dreams in the sport," while The Boston Globe called them "irresistible." Now, in The People's Game, the third volume of Baseball, Dr. Seymour offers the first book devoted entirely to the history of the game outside of the professional leagues, revealing how, from its early beginnings up to World War II, baseball truly became the great American pastime. He looks at the bond between baseball and boys through the decades, the game's place in institutions from colleges to prisons to the armed forces, the rise of women's baseball with nineteenth century feminism, and the struggles of black players and clubs from the later years of slavery up to the Second World War. The national sport pops up in the most unexpected places, from the cavalrymen's game at Fort Apache called off because of Geronimo's escape, to the scene of Philippine head-hunters enthusiastically playing ball, to General MacArthur as player/manager of the Fort Leavenworth team bringing in professional ringers. And the contests Dr. Seymour describes are as vivid and exciting as yesterday's game. Whether discussing the birth of softball or the origins of the seventh inning stretch, Dr. Seymour enriches his wide research with fascinating details and entertaining anecdotes as well as his own wealth of baseball experience. The People's Game brings to life the central role of baseball for generations of Americans.



Playing in Isolation

Playing in Isolation Author Junwei Yu
ISBN-10 9780803206892
Release 2007-12-01
Pages 287
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Despite the political instability characterizing twentieth-century Taiwan, the value of baseball in the lives of Taiwanese has been a constant since the game was introduced in 1895. The game first gained popularity on the island under the Japanese occupation, and that popularity continued after World War II despite the withdrawal of the Japanese and an official lack of support from the new state power, the Chinese Nationalist Party.



Baseball

Baseball Author Harold Seymour
ISBN-10 0199839174
Release 1989-07-13
Pages 392
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Now available in paperback, Harold Seymour and Dorothy Seymour Mills' Baseball: The Early Years recounts the true story of how baseball came into being and how it developed into a highly organized business and social institution. The Early Years, traces the growth of baseball from the time of the first recorded ball game at Valley Forge during the revolution until the formation of the two present-day major leagues in 1903. By investigating previously unknown sources, the book uncovers the real story of how baseball evolved from a gentleman's amateur sport of "well-bred play followed by well-laden banquet tables" into a professional sport where big leagues operate under their own laws. Offering countless anecdotes and a wealth of new information, the authors explode many cherished myths, including the one which claims that Abner Doubleday "invented" baseball in 1839. They describe the influence of baseball on American business, manners, morals, social institutions, and even show business, as well as depicting the types of men who became the first professional ball players, club owners, and managers, including Spalding, McGraw, Comiskey, and Connie Mack. Note: On August 2, 2010, Oxford University Press made public that it would credit Dorothy Seymour Mills as co-author of the three baseball histories previously "authored" solely by her late husband, Harold Seymour. The Seymours collaborated on Baseball: The Early Years (1960), Baseball: The Golden Age (1971) and Baseball: The People's Game (1991).



The Everything Kids Baseball Book

The Everything Kids  Baseball Book Author Greg Jacobs
ISBN-10 9781440571770
Release 2014-02-18
Pages 176
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Get in the game! Do you know: What teams make up the American and National leagues? What was the first team to wear numbers on their backs? What two players have played every position? What a Bugs Bunny changeup is? The Everything Kids' Baseball Book, 8th Edition answers all these questions and more! From the ballpark to the backyard, all the action, fun, and excitement of America's favorite pastime is captured in this new edition. Packed with the latest stats and more than thirty fun puzzles and activities, this book teaches you about: The history of baseball Baseball stats and recordholders Your favorite baseball legends and current players Keeping score on a scorecard How to develop your baseball skills Fantasy baseball teams and more! This book gives you the know-how to bat a thousand--from baseball trivia to the rules of the game. It's sure to be a grand slam!



A People s History of Poverty in America

A People s History of Poverty in America Author Stephen Pimpare
ISBN-10 9781595586964
Release 2011-06-07
Pages 336
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In this compulsively readable social history, political scientist Stephen Pimpare vividly describes poverty from the perspective of poor and welfare-reliant Americans from the big city to the rural countryside. He focuses on how the poor have created community, secured shelter, and found food and illuminates their battles for dignity and respect. Through prodigious archival research and lucid analysis, Pimpare details the ways in which charity and aid for the poor have been inseparable, more often than not, from the scorn and disapproval of those who would help them. In the rich and often surprising historical testimonies he has collected from the poor in America, Pimpare overturns any simple conclusions about how the poor see themselves or what it feels like to be poor—and he shows clearly that the poor are all too often aware that charity comes with a price. It is that price that Pimpare eloquently questions in this book, reminding us through powerful anecdotes, some heart-wrenching and some surprisingly humorous, that poverty is not simply a moral failure.



The American Indian Integration of Baseball

The American Indian Integration of Baseball Author Jeffrey P. Powers-Beck
ISBN-10 9780803237452
Release 2004
Pages 269
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For many the entry of Jackie Robinson into Major League Baseball in 1947 marked the beginning of integration in professional baseball, but the entry of American Indians into the game during the previous half-century and the persistent racism directed toward them is not as well known. From the time that Louis Sockalexis stepped onto a Major League Baseball field in 1897, American Indians have had a presence in professional baseball. Unfortunately, it has not always been welcomed or respected, and Native athletes have faced racist stereotypes, foul epithets, and abuse from fans and players throughout their careers. The American Indian Integration of Baseball describes the experiences and contributions of American Indians as they courageously tried to make their place in America?s national game during the first half of the twentieth century. Jeffrey Powers-Beck provides biographical profiles of forgotten Native players such as Elijah Pinnance, George Johnson, Louis Leroy, and Moses Yellow Horse, along with profiles of better-known athletes such as Jim Thorpe, Charles Albert Bender, and John Tortes Meyers. Combining analysis of popular-press accounts with records from boarding schools for Native youth, where baseball was used as a tool of assimilation, Powers-Beck shows how American Indians battled discrimination and racism to integrate American baseball.



Final Innings

Final Innings Author Dean A. Sullivan
ISBN-10 9780803259652
Release 2010
Pages 344
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Culling the most pertinent, newsworthy, and just plain curious stories from newspapers and periodicals, and putting each into context, Sullivan constructs an informative and entertaining account of Major League baseball from 1972 through 2008. The 105 essays cover key topics such as George Steinbrenner's purchase of the Yankees, the first free-agent draft, the coming of lights to Wrigley Field, the cancellation of the World Series in 1994, and the BALCO steroid probe. They also bring to light lesser-known gems like the rise of sabermetrics and the federal injunction against team owners in 1995. This book offers a you-are-there view of the events that made baseball into the game we know today.



The Earth and Its Peoples A Global History Since 1500

The Earth and Its Peoples  A Global History  Since 1500 Author CTI Reviews
ISBN-10 9781478439929
Release 2016-10-16
Pages 78
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Facts101 is your complete guide to The Earth and Its Peoples, A Global History, Since 1500, Vol. 2. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.



Baseball

Baseball Author Benjamin G. Rader
ISBN-10 9780252075506
Release 2008
Pages 296
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A succinct history of baseball, newly revised and updated



Baseball in the Garden of Eden

Baseball in the Garden of Eden Author John Thorn
ISBN-10 9781439170212
Release 2011-03-15
Pages 384
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Think you know how the game of baseball began? Think again. Forget Abner Doubleday and Cooperstown. Forget Alexander Joy Cartwright and the New York Knickerbockers. Instead, meet Daniel Lucius Adams, William Rufus Wheaton, and Louis Fenn Wadsworth, each of whom has a stronger claim to baseball paternity than Doubleday or Cartwright. But did baseball even have a father—or did it just evolve from other bat-and-ball games? John Thorn, baseball’s preeminent historian, examines the creation story of the game and finds it all to be a gigantic lie, not only the Doubleday legend, so long recognized with a wink and a nudge. From its earliest days baseball was a vehicle for gambling (much like cricket, a far more popular game in early America), a proxy form of class warfare, infused with racism as was the larger society, invigorated if ultimately corrupted by gamblers, hustlers, and shady entrepreneurs. Thorn traces the rise of the New York version of the game over other variations popular in Massachusetts and Philadelphia. He shows how the sport’s increasing popularity in the early decades of the nineteenth century mirrored the migration of young men from farms and small towns to cities, especially New York. And he charts the rise of secret professionalism and the origin of the notorious “reserve clause,” essential innovations for gamblers and capitalists. No matter how much you know about the history of baseball, you will find something new in every chapter. Thorn also introduces us to a host of early baseball stars who helped to drive the tremendous popularity and growth of the game in the post–Civil War era: Jim Creighton, perhaps the first true professional player; Candy Cummings, the pitcher who claimed to have invented the curveball; Albert Spalding, the ballplayer who would grow rich from the game and shape its creation myth; Hall of Fame brothers George and Harry Wright; Cap Anson, the first man to record three thousand hits and a virulent racist; and many others. Add bluff, bluster, and bravado, and toss in an illicit romance, an unknown son, a lost ball club, an epidemic scare, and you have a baseball detective story like none ever written. Thorn shows how a small religious cult became instrumental in the commission that was established to determine the origins of the game and why the selection of Abner Doubleday as baseball’s father was as strangely logical as it was patently absurd. Entertaining from the first page to the last, Baseball in the Garden of Eden is a tale of good and evil, and the snake proves the most interesting character. It is full of heroes, scoundrels, and dupes; it contains more scandal by far than the 1919 Black Sox World Series fix. More than a history of the game, Baseball in the Garden of Eden tells the story of nineteenth-century America, a land of opportunity and limitation, of glory and greed—all present in the wondrous alloy that is our nation and its pastime.